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REVIEW-The Marvels by: Brian Selznick

Summary:

Caldecott Award winner and bookmaking trailblazer Brian Selznick once again plays with the form he invented and takes readers on a voyage!

Two seemingly unrelated stories--one in words, the other in pictures--come together. The illustrated story begins in 1766 with Billy Marvel, the lone survivor of a shipwreck, and charts the adventures of his family of actors over five generations. The prose story opens in 1990 and follows Joseph, who has run away from school to an estranged uncle's puzzling house in London, where he, along with the reader, must piece together many mysteries.

 

Honestly I’m a bit shocked.

OVERALL REACTION:

Yes, you heard that. Going into this book I had HIGH expectations, I was a HUGE fan of Brian’s other book The Invention of Hugo Cabret. So much that it made it to my favorite books of 2015. It was PURE AMAZING! The story CONSTANTLY switched from pictures and words, and it was the whole story was just BRILLIANT.

Needless to say, I thought I would like it as much as The Invention of Hugo Cabret. Unfortunately, none of that happened.

One of the thing’s I despised about this book was the fact that it tried to make this story meaningful, but failed miserably.┬áIt tried SOO HARD to shove it all into my face, and attempted to make me feel bad for this MC. Sadly, I found it agitated me EVERY SINGLE TIME! It tried so hard that it actually had me rolling my eyes, EVERY SINGLE TIME something SAPPY rolled around.

It didn’t really have anything to work with. We get a good story, interesting characters, not much known about the background of either, and then we find out it’s fake. After we found at that, I was done. What’s the point of building up a story if you’re going to only drag it down and not even have a purpose for doing it?

The ending made me dissatisfied, and bitter. One of my FAVORITE thing’s about Brian’s writing is the food for thought that comes after you’ve finished the book. You find yourself constantly looking back and thinking, and wondering if thing’s would be different. This time it did the opposite thing, the ending was confusing as well as forgot to properly wrap up everything. Honestly, it felt a bit rushed to me. This is definently NOT Brian’s best work.

In closing, I believe this wasn’t Brian’s best work, I would much rather prefer to read The Invention of Hugo Cabret, it was WAY more interesting and provided a VERY satisfied ending.

Star Rating: 3/5 Stars

Percentage Rating: 49%