My top 5 FAVORITE Realistic Fiction books

Hey guys,

After finishing an AMAZING entitled See you in the Cosmos, I had an idea.

I know, some of you are like freaking out. Chill. Chill. I know, it’s a bit crazy. But in honor of LOVING this recent read, I’m going to recommend my top 5 favorite realistic fiction books.

Enjoy!  (;

 

Out of my Mind by: Shanon Draper


Summary:
Melody is not like most people. She cannot walk or talk, but she has a photographic memory; she can remember every detail of everything she has ever experienced. She is smarter than most of the adults who try to diagnose her and smarter than her classmates in her integrated classroom - the very same classmates who dismiss her as mentally challenged because she cannot tell them otherwise. But Melody refuses to be defined by cerebral palsy. And she's determined to let everyone know it - somehow.

In this breakthrough story, reminiscent of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, from multiple Coretta Scott King Award-winner Sharon Draper, readers will come to know a brilliant mind and a brave spirit who will change forever how they look at anyone with a disability.

I remember when I read this, I LOVE this book because it’s one of those books that let’s you think and re-evaluate your life. It’s SOO good and I highly recommend it.

 


Wonder by: R.J. Palicio


Summary:
I won't describe what I look like. Whatever you're thinking, it's probably worse.

August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school—until now. He's about to start 5th grade at Beecher Prep, and if you've ever been the new kid then you know how hard that can be. The thing is Auggie's just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he's just like them, despite appearances?

R. J. Palacio has written a spare, warm, uplifting story that will have readers laughing one minute and wiping away tears the next. With wonderfully realistic family interactions (flawed, but loving), lively school scenes, and short chapters, Wonder is accessible to readers of all levels.

Probably my FAVORITE of this list, Wonder was a SUPER interesting read that was an emotional rollercoaster the whole way through. Easily one of my favorite reads two years ago, Wonder will NOT disappoint.

 


Counting by 7’s by: Holly Goldberg Sloan


Summary:
In the tradition of Out of My Mind, Wonder, and Mockingbird, this is an intensely moving middle grade novel about being an outsider, coping with loss, and discovering the true meaning of family. 

Willow Chance is a twelve-year-old genius, obsessed with nature and diagnosing medical conditions, who finds it comforting to count by 7s. It has never been easy for her to connect with anyone other than her adoptive parents, but that hasn’t kept her from leading a quietly happy life... until now.

Suddenly Willow’s world is tragically changed when her parents both die in a car crash, leaving her alone in a baffling world. The triumph of this book is that it is not a tragedy. This extraordinarily odd, but extraordinarily endearing, girl manages to push through her grief. Her journey to find a fascinatingly diverse and fully believable surrogate family is a joy and a revelation to read.

Ever in need of a heartwarming story, This is MY PICK! As soon as I finished this, I was SOO HAPPY! The ending was SUPER satisfying, and I really LOVED this story…


 

See you in the Cosmos by: Jack Chang


Summary:
11-year-old Alex Petroski loves space and rockets, his mom, his brother, and his dog Carl Sagan—named for his hero, the real-life astronomer. All he wants is to launch his golden iPod into space the way Carl Sagan (the man, not the dog) launched his Golden Record on the Voyager spacecraft in 1977. From Colorado to New Mexico, Las Vegas to L.A., Alex records a journey on his iPod to show other lifeforms what life on earth, his earth, is like. But his destination keeps changing. And the funny, lost, remarkable people he meets along the way can only partially prepare him for the secrets he’ll uncover—from the truth about his long-dead dad to the fact that, for a kid with a troubled mom and a mostly not-around brother, he has way more family than he ever knew.

THIS BOOK COMES OUT MARCH 2nd! PRE-ORDER ASAP! I LOVED this book. From the diversity in characters to how the story is all told in recordings, this was a super interesting read that I HIGHLY SUGGEST!

 


 

Paper Things by: Jennifer Richard Jacobson


Summary:
When forced to choose between staying with her guardian and being with her big brother, Ari chose her big brother. There’s just one problem—Gage doesn’t actually have a place to live.

When Ari’s mother died four years ago, she had two final wishes: that Ari and her older brother, Gage, would stay together always, and that Ari would go to Carter, the middle school for gifted students. So when nineteen-year-old Gage decides he can no longer live with their bossy guardian, Janna, Ari knows she has to go with him. But it’s been two months, and Gage still hasn’t found them an apartment. He and Ari have been "couch surfing," staying with Gage’s friend in a tiny apartment, crashing with Gage’s girlfriend and two roommates, and if necessary, sneaking into a juvenile shelter to escape the cold Maine nights. But all of this jumping around makes it hard for Ari to keep up with her schoolwork, never mind her friendships, and getting into Carter starts to seem impossible. Will Ari be forced to break one of her promises to Mama? Told in an open, authentic voice, this nuanced story of hiding in plain sight may have readers thinking about homelessness in a whole new way.

 

That’s it! Those are my Favorite Realistic Fiction reads! Let me know in the comments if I’ve missed anything. Later this week I’m planning on re-reading Frindle , (Thank’s Caroline)and then continuing on finishing Ettiquite and Espionage. Thanks for reading!

Bye!!!